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One Of The UK’s More Random Acts Of Healthcare.


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So just those two years, then?  What if you’re 71, or 76? Or 80 plus?  I think this is very unfair – my Mum got shingles when she was 83. Is there a logical explanation for this very age-specific scheme?

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10 thoughts on “One Of The UK’s More Random Acts Of Healthcare.

    1. Thanks, Jo. No intrusion 🙂 Just drowning some atm, so haven’t been around on here. Be back at some point. I would’ve emailed u, but I don’t knw yr address. Feel free to use my contact page if u ever want to. Hope yr doing as well as u can be, and that u won the roach war.
      L. X

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Don’t worry about emailing me. That just adds to your to-do list. 🙂 Yes, I won the roach war, but now I’m fighting the rat war. But I think I’m winning that one too.

        I know, I really need to make an “about” page for my blog. It’s on my to-do list. 🙂 But I’ll try to add my email address to my avatar so you can find it in the future: painkills2@aol.com

        Like

  1. yes, still random….but at least one can see where they tried to arrive at those ages…it still doesn’t really make sense. and actually, EVERYONE needs vaccinated against shingles, since you can only get it if you have had chickenpox, because if you have had chickenpox, then the virus that also causes shingles is dormant in your body, until you are at a vulnerable moment for it to opportunistically reappear as shingles.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yep, I understand that. Other members of the herpes family work similarly – with the alleged exception of chickenpox, which you’re only supposed to be able to get once and I had that three times between age 3 and 14.

      All the herpes family – HSV1, HSV2, shingles (there’s another one, brain farting now so can’t remember) – are opportunistic little blighters. Seems to run in my family – I am the only one who has never had a cold sore, but the only one who’s had chick pox more than once. That Mum had shingles which lasted months and months doesn’t fill me with confidence for my (hopefully) forthcoming years.

      I would’ve thought they should have approached shingles vaccs differently. Like, for anyone with immunosuppression issues/ on steroids or other immunosuppression meds, start there. It isn’t only the elderly that get it, a friend of mine in her 30’s had a horrendous attack, which again lasted months. Obv, the weaker the immune system, the more run down you are, etc, the higher the likelihood of shingles or other herpes family breaking through your normal defences.

      Just think that if they had to limit quantity, there were better, more logical ways of doing it than picking 70 and 79 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I know! I saw it in my G.P surgery last year, and had to take a photo. It’s unbelievable, isn’t it? I asked my G.P what the reasoning behind it was, but he came out with some utterly lame “reason”.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. http://www.bbc.com/news/health-23901636

    The government-led programme will initially offer the vaccine to those aged 70 and 79.
    Shingles, or herpes zoster, is an infection of a nerve and the area of skin around it, and can cause a painful rash. Around 800,000 people will be eligible for the vaccine in the first year of the programme… Over the next few years, the programme will expand to include more of the 70-to-79 age group across the UK until it is fully covered. After that, the jab should only need to be offered to people as they reach their 70th birthdays.

    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/pages/shingles-vaccination.aspx

    How long will the shingles vaccine protect me for? It’s difficult to be precise, but research suggests the shingles vaccine will protect you for at least five years, probably longer.

    Liked by 1 person

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